Melmoth, a book review

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‘She has come. She has come for me.’

Melmoth unravels as a brooding, morose, gothic tale of a wanderer, a woman, an ancient mythical monster that resides in the darkest corners and bears witness to all the evils that unfold just when you think no-one is watching. Sarah Perry does complete justice to the atmosphere and tone of the book, at times, legitimately, spine-chilling, tempting you to take a quick peek over your shoulder, just to make sure no-one is watching. Continue reading

Signs for Lost Children by Sarah Moss

IMG_2295With this duology, I’m assured of Sarah Moss as a writer of incredible nuance, intelligence, observation, elegance and style. Signs for Lost Children picks up just where Bodies of Light left, so I’d really encourage one to start with Bodies of Light before they try this as the motivations of these characters, the backstories and context would all be lost by starting directly here.

Bodies of Light triumphs in its themes, but rushes through the years. Signs for Lost Children, on the other hand, is set across a single year following Ally’s marriage. Continue reading

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

IMG_1215This was my first brush with Barnes, and needless to say, I was quite floored by the brilliance of this mighty little book. The Sense of An Ending is an examination of memory and history, and the convergence of these grand themes from an unreliable, delusional narrator: Tony Webster, an old man looking back on particular events of his life. It’s an intricate portrayal of how unreliable memories can be, how we might edit things out and recreate histories of ourselves, how certain unpleasant memories can be repressed and modified into versions we ’d like to present instead. Continue reading

My Top 10 TBR for the year

fullsizeoutput_4bfcAs readers, we are always trying to set and manage TBRs, there are books we separately want to get to and sometimes lists help in sorting what those priority books are. I’m generally horrible with TBRs, but I thought it would be fun to set aside a list of 10 acclaimed works that I’d like to read this year! There’s a mish-mash of modern classics, shorter/chunkier ones, and must-read books that have long been on my radar.

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Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACategory: Classics, Historical, Gothic Fiction
Rating: 5/5
Cultural: UK
Author: Daphne du Maurier

What could I possibly say that hasn’t already been said? Rebecca is a book that doesn’t really need a review. So, very simply put, my three word review: I loved it.

Having read Rebecca, you cannot not picture Manderley, its coastal cliffs & waters, the white azaleas in the Happy Valley, the battalion of lush, blood-red rhododendrons; its serene, yet fierce & restrained beauty. Continue reading

The Enchanted Islands by Allison Amend

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACategory: Historical Fiction
Rating: 4/5
Author: Allison Amend

This book was such a pleasant surprise! Enchanted Islands follows the story of Frances Conway, starting from her childhood all the way till she is very old. I absolutely loved this charming, emotional, honest and far from ordinary life of Frances Conway. Right from her childhood in Duluth to her adolescent years in Chicago to Nebraska, to Galapagos Islands for most part and finally to San Francisco, its such an incredible journey that doesn’t skip a beat. Continue reading

A book that took my breath away…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACategory: Literary Contemporary Fiction
Rating: 4/5
Author: Sarah Moss

It’s been almost a year since I read The Tidal Zone, but if someone were to ask me which was the best opening chapter that I’ve read in recent times, in a blink of an eye I’d say this one. I remember reading the first chapter, pausing for a moment and realising that I wanted to slowly savour and yet devour this book all at once. Here’s a little snippet of how it all starts.

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