Melmoth, a book review

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‘She has come. She has come for me.’

Melmoth unravels as a brooding, morose, gothic tale of a wanderer, a woman, an ancient mythical monster that resides in the darkest corners and bears witness to all the evils that unfold just when you think no-one is watching. Sarah Perry does complete justice to the atmosphere and tone of the book, at times, legitimately, spine-chilling, tempting you to take a quick peek over your shoulder, just to make sure no-one is watching. Continue reading

The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee

IMG_2541It’s taken me a month and half to finish this mammoth of a book, the Middlemarch of medical non-fiction, The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer. It has been one of the most informative reads I’ve ever read. Mukherjee presents a very complex topic in an accessible and interesting way striking the perfect balance in being descriptive without being overbearing & clinical. Though this book is as accessible as a biography of Cancer can possibly get, it still is a very challenging read and certainly not a breeze to get through. So in that sense it feels like an achievement just to have finished it.

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The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

IMG_1215This was my first brush with Barnes, and needless to say, I was quite floored by the brilliance of this mighty little book. The Sense of An Ending is an examination of memory and history, and the convergence of these grand themes from an unreliable, delusional narrator: Tony Webster, an old man looking back on particular events of his life. It’s an intricate portrayal of how unreliable memories can be, how we might edit things out and recreate histories of ourselves, how certain unpleasant memories can be repressed and modified into versions we ’d like to present instead. Continue reading

Snow in May by Kseniya Melnik

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACategory: Short Stories, Realist stories
Rating: 4/5
Cultural: Russia
Author: Kseniya Melnik

This realist short story collection turned out to be such a pleasant surprise! Snow in May is a collection of stories set in and around the Siberian port town of Magadan situated closer to Alaska than to any other major Russian city. Despite a bustling hub, Magadan has a dark and tumultuous past, as it was once a gateway to the Gulag network, Stalin’s cruelest labour camps and stories resonate with a tinge of the town’s dark past.

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