Red Clocks by Leni Zumas (a rave than a review)

IMG_4477Leni Zumas’s Red Clocks is easily one of my favourite books of the year. It’s a brilliant, incredibly thought-provoking and simply exquisite novel. It’s been shelved as dystopia/science fiction and it’s really none of that. It’s mildly speculative at best, contemporary, and as Zumas calls it, a ‘para-topian’ novel, set very much in today’s society. The only change being, an act has been passed in the United States called the Personhood Amendment, by which a fertilized single-celled zygote is considered a legal citizen with the right to liberty and life. Continue reading

Normal People by Sally Rooney

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Normal People at its core is an intimate, emotional and complex relationship between Marianne and Connell that sinusoids between romantic and platonic, truthful and manipulative. While I certainly liked how realistic the portrayal of ‘modern love’ is, I found it increasingly cumbersome to read as it progressed. Connell and Marianne are almost like magnets, their opposite poles aligned at times and experiencing this subliminal, unrestrained, ferocious attraction and at other times almost repelling each other with equal force. As a reader, your caught in between these extremes and you unravel this incredibly complex, often unpredictable, intimate yet turbulent relationship. As this novel progresses, it increasingly read like an elaborate ceremonial dance of egos, of unsaid communication having far-reaching consequences, and at times I just couldn’t see the sense in their actions/decisions.
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I’ve read reviews where the writing style has been criticized. On that note, however, I disagree. Rooney’s writing is sparse, and I thought it was beautifully done. It’s sharp, incisive almost, without a single word being wasted. To sum things up, for me, it was an okay read. The character study, which started really strong, somewhere lost it’s footing, stumbling & getting a little too embroiled into the character’s messy lives. I began to lose interest. As I read, I kept flipping back to see how many pages were left to read. Make of that, what you will.
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I’m still curious to try Conversations with Friends, though I’m in no real rush.

Signs for Lost Children by Sarah Moss

IMG_2295With this duology, I’m assured of Sarah Moss as a writer of incredible nuance, intelligence, observation, elegance and style. Signs for Lost Children picks up just where Bodies of Light left, so I’d really encourage one to start with Bodies of Light before they try this as the motivations of these characters, the backstories and context would all be lost by starting directly here.

Bodies of Light triumphs in its themes, but rushes through the years. Signs for Lost Children, on the other hand, is set across a single year following Ally’s marriage. Continue reading

Bodies of Light by Sarah Moss

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Review: Oh Sarah Moss! How wonderfully you write and how nice it feels to be wrapped up in your words like a blanket! Bodies of Light was an intriguing, wonderfully written, and complex story of female roles in the 19th century, of women fighting to find their place in professional and academic settings than being restricted to domestic roles, of a dysfunctional family, a domineering mother, of mental health and its stigma, of art and its appreciation, Continue reading