Red Clocks by Leni Zumas (a rave than a review)

IMG_4477Leni Zumas’s Red Clocks is easily one of my favourite books of the year. It’s a brilliant, incredibly thought-provoking and simply exquisite novel. It’s been shelved as dystopia/science fiction and it’s really none of that. It’s mildly speculative at best, contemporary, and as Zumas calls it, a ‘para-topian’ novel, set very much in today’s society. The only change being, an act has been passed in the United States called the Personhood Amendment, by which a fertilized single-celled zygote is considered a legal citizen with the right to liberty and life. Continue reading

A realist collection on girlhood and growing up

IMG_4814How to Breathe Underwater by Julie Orringer was such a brilliant, emotionally resonant, pensive and slightly dark collection of stories focussing on girlhood and growing up. Every story is incredibly distinct and beautifully realized. It deals with complex issues like dealing with the loss of a parent, sibling rivalry, the very cruel things that children are capable of doing to one another, friendship and sisterhood. Some might find this collection a little too dark, a little too bleak, but I found it incredibly realistic. Continue reading

Melmoth, a book review

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‘She has come. She has come for me.’

Melmoth unravels as a brooding, morose, gothic tale of a wanderer, a woman, an ancient mythical monster that resides in the darkest corners and bears witness to all the evils that unfold just when you think no-one is watching. Sarah Perry does complete justice to the atmosphere and tone of the book, at times, legitimately, spine-chilling, tempting you to take a quick peek over your shoulder, just to make sure no-one is watching. Continue reading

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

IMG_1215This was my first brush with Barnes, and needless to say, I was quite floored by the brilliance of this mighty little book. The Sense of An Ending is an examination of memory and history, and the convergence of these grand themes from an unreliable, delusional narrator: Tony Webster, an old man looking back on particular events of his life. It’s an intricate portrayal of how unreliable memories can be, how we might edit things out and recreate histories of ourselves, how certain unpleasant memories can be repressed and modified into versions we ’d like to present instead. Continue reading

Bodies of Light by Sarah Moss

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Review: Oh Sarah Moss! How wonderfully you write and how nice it feels to be wrapped up in your words like a blanket! Bodies of Light was an intriguing, wonderfully written, and complex story of female roles in the 19th century, of women fighting to find their place in professional and academic settings than being restricted to domestic roles, of a dysfunctional family, a domineering mother, of mental health and its stigma, of art and its appreciation, Continue reading

Bobcat and Other Stories by Rebecca Lee

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“If you have ever felt that the table at which you sit contains everything and everybody that matters to you, like a little boat, then you know how I felt. It doesn’t feel secure at all, but rather a little tipsy. It is unnerving to love a single place so much. There are no anchors to the world outside, the cities in the distance, the country around you. There is just this: the six of you afloat so happily in the temporary day.”

~

Review: This realist collection of 6 stories really took me by surprise Continue reading

Sight by Jessie Greengrass

IMG_0300Category: Literary Experimental Fiction
Author: Jessie Greengrass
Rating: 4/5

I struggle to write a review that adequately captures the complexity of this 193 page book. Sight, very simplistically, is a pregnant woman’s ambivalence towards motherhood rising from her own unconventional upbringing. It slides seamlessly between the narrator’s life and the lives of historical figures responsible for the discovery of X-rays, the emergence of psychoanalysis and the birth of modern surgery for reasons that gradually become apparent. Continue reading