Melmoth, a book review

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‘She has come. She has come for me.’

Melmoth unravels as a brooding, morose, gothic tale of a wanderer, a woman, an ancient mythical monster that resides in the darkest corners and bears witness to all the evils that unfold just when you think no-one is watching. Sarah Perry does complete justice to the atmosphere and tone of the book, at times, legitimately, spine-chilling, tempting you to take a quick peek over your shoulder, just to make sure no-one is watching. Continue reading

Signs for Lost Children by Sarah Moss

IMG_2295With this duology, I’m assured of Sarah Moss as a writer of incredible nuance, intelligence, observation, elegance and style. Signs for Lost Children picks up just where Bodies of Light left, so I’d really encourage one to start with Bodies of Light before they try this as the motivations of these characters, the backstories and context would all be lost by starting directly here.

Bodies of Light triumphs in its themes, but rushes through the years. Signs for Lost Children, on the other hand, is set across a single year following Ally’s marriage. Continue reading

Bodies of Light by Sarah Moss

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Review: Oh Sarah Moss! How wonderfully you write and how nice it feels to be wrapped up in your words like a blanket! Bodies of Light was an intriguing, wonderfully written, and complex story of female roles in the 19th century, of women fighting to find their place in professional and academic settings than being restricted to domestic roles, of a dysfunctional family, a domineering mother, of mental health and its stigma, of art and its appreciation, Continue reading

Circe by Madeline Miller

IMG_0761Category: Greek Mythology, Historical Fiction, Fantasy
Rating: 5/5
Author: Madeline Miller
Circe was my first foray into Madeline Miller’s work having not read her immensely popular first novel, The Song of Achilles. Aside from the fact that it’s extensively based on Greek mythology, I didn’t know much else of what to expect and went in completely blind.

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Snow in May by Kseniya Melnik

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACategory: Short Stories, Realist stories
Rating: 4/5
Cultural: Russia
Author: Kseniya Melnik

This realist short story collection turned out to be such a pleasant surprise! Snow in May is a collection of stories set in and around the Siberian port town of Magadan situated closer to Alaska than to any other major Russian city. Despite a bustling hub, Magadan has a dark and tumultuous past, as it was once a gateway to the Gulag network, Stalin’s cruelest labour camps and stories resonate with a tinge of the town’s dark past.

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Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACategory: Classics, Historical, Gothic Fiction
Rating: 5/5
Cultural: UK
Author: Daphne du Maurier

What could I possibly say that hasn’t already been said? Rebecca is a book that doesn’t really need a review. So, very simply put, my three word review: I loved it.

Having read Rebecca, you cannot not picture Manderley, its coastal cliffs & waters, the white azaleas in the Happy Valley, the battalion of lush, blood-red rhododendrons; its serene, yet fierce & restrained beauty. Continue reading