The Idiot by Elif Batuman

2774F1A1-1DCD-4105-B865-87CE624B2734Here’s my attempt at penning down a review for The Idiot, having now had some time away from the book. I found The Idiot wholly original, thwarting traditional narrative techniques and feigning all importance to the plot, twist or thrill. It’s a story that acutely captures the ordinary mundanities and absurdities of life in sharp relief while still managing to stay engaging and entertaining for almost 500 pages. We follow Selin, an 18-year-old, born to Turkish-American immigrants, for the first year of her university life in Harvard and a summer spent volunteering in Hungary. Continue reading

Red Clocks by Leni Zumas (a rave than a review)

IMG_4477Leni Zumas’s Red Clocks is easily one of my favourite books of the year. It’s a brilliant, incredibly thought-provoking and simply exquisite novel. It’s been shelved as dystopia/science fiction and it’s really none of that. It’s mildly speculative at best, contemporary, and as Zumas calls it, a ‘para-topian’ novel, set very much in today’s society. The only change being, an act has been passed in the United States called the Personhood Amendment, by which a fertilized single-celled zygote is considered a legal citizen with the right to liberty and life. Continue reading

My favourite memoir, so far, this year

IMG_3072I’m certainly not the first person to be recommending Tara Westover’s Educated to you. But if all the shooting star worth praise hasn’t convinced you yet, let me try and tell you why you should be reading this memoir.

It opens with a gorgeous description of rural Idaho, the Indian Princess mountain as it’s rugged backdrop, into the home of one family at odds with the rest of the world. Tara Westover was born in 1986 to survivalist Mormon parents without any trace of documentation to account for/or register her birth. Continue reading

My favourite short story collection of 2018, so far.

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“There is this thing that distance does where it subtracts warmth and context and history and each find that they are arguing with a stranger.”

When I finished the last page, I wanted to turn back and start over, that’s just how brilliant this was.

What it Means When A Man Falls From the Sky by Leslie Nneka Arimah is an exquisitely conceived collection of realist and fantastical stories. Continue reading

The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee

IMG_2541It’s taken me a month and half to finish this mammoth of a book, the Middlemarch of medical non-fiction, The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer. It has been one of the most informative reads I’ve ever read. Mukherjee presents a very complex topic in an accessible and interesting way striking the perfect balance in being descriptive without being overbearing & clinical. Though this book is as accessible as a biography of Cancer can possibly get, it still is a very challenging read and certainly not a breeze to get through. So in that sense it feels like an achievement just to have finished it.

Continue reading