Red Clocks by Leni Zumas (a rave than a review)

IMG_4477Leni Zumas’s Red Clocks is easily one of my favourite books of the year. It’s a brilliant, incredibly thought-provoking and simply exquisite novel. It’s been shelved as dystopia/science fiction and it’s really none of that. It’s mildly speculative at best, contemporary, and as Zumas calls it, a ‘para-topian’ novel, set very much in today’s society. The only change being, an act has been passed in the United States called the Personhood Amendment, by which a fertilized single-celled zygote is considered a legal citizen with the right to liberty and life. Continue reading

Normal People by Sally Rooney

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Normal People at its core is an intimate, emotional and complex relationship between Marianne and Connell that sinusoids between romantic and platonic, truthful and manipulative. While I certainly liked how realistic the portrayal of ‘modern love’ is, I found it increasingly cumbersome to read as it progressed. Connell and Marianne are almost like magnets, their opposite poles aligned at times and experiencing this subliminal, unrestrained, ferocious attraction and at other times almost repelling each other with equal force. As a reader, your caught in between these extremes and you unravel this incredibly complex, often unpredictable, intimate yet turbulent relationship. As this novel progresses, it increasingly read like an elaborate ceremonial dance of egos, of unsaid communication having far-reaching consequences, and at times I just couldn’t see the sense in their actions/decisions.
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I’ve read reviews where the writing style has been criticized. On that note, however, I disagree. Rooney’s writing is sparse, and I thought it was beautifully done. It’s sharp, incisive almost, without a single word being wasted. To sum things up, for me, it was an okay read. The character study, which started really strong, somewhere lost it’s footing, stumbling & getting a little too embroiled into the character’s messy lives. I began to lose interest. As I read, I kept flipping back to see how many pages were left to read. Make of that, what you will.
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I’m still curious to try Conversations with Friends, though I’m in no real rush.

Melmoth, a book review

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‘She has come. She has come for me.’

Melmoth unravels as a brooding, morose, gothic tale of a wanderer, a woman, an ancient mythical monster that resides in the darkest corners and bears witness to all the evils that unfold just when you think no-one is watching. Sarah Perry does complete justice to the atmosphere and tone of the book, at times, legitimately, spine-chilling, tempting you to take a quick peek over your shoulder, just to make sure no-one is watching. Continue reading

My favourite memoir, so far, this year

IMG_3072I’m certainly not the first person to be recommending Tara Westover’s Educated to you. But if all the shooting star worth praise hasn’t convinced you yet, let me try and tell you why you should be reading this memoir.

It opens with a gorgeous description of rural Idaho, the Indian Princess mountain as it’s rugged backdrop, into the home of one family at odds with the rest of the world. Tara Westover was born in 1986 to survivalist Mormon parents without any trace of documentation to account for/or register her birth. Continue reading

My favourite short story collection of 2018, so far.

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“There is this thing that distance does where it subtracts warmth and context and history and each find that they are arguing with a stranger.”

When I finished the last page, I wanted to turn back and start over, that’s just how brilliant this was.

What it Means When A Man Falls From the Sky by Leslie Nneka Arimah is an exquisitely conceived collection of realist and fantastical stories. Continue reading

The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee

IMG_2541It’s taken me a month and half to finish this mammoth of a book, the Middlemarch of medical non-fiction, The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer. It has been one of the most informative reads I’ve ever read. Mukherjee presents a very complex topic in an accessible and interesting way striking the perfect balance in being descriptive without being overbearing & clinical. Though this book is as accessible as a biography of Cancer can possibly get, it still is a very challenging read and certainly not a breeze to get through. So in that sense it feels like an achievement just to have finished it.

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