My favourite short story collection of 2018, so far.

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“There is this thing that distance does where it subtracts warmth and context and history and each find that they are arguing with a stranger.”

When I finished the last page, I wanted to turn back and start over, that’s just how brilliant this was.

What it Means When A Man Falls From the Sky by Leslie Nneka Arimah is an exquisitely conceived collection of realist and fantastical stories. Continue reading

The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee

IMG_2541It’s taken me a month and half to finish this mammoth of a book, the Middlemarch of medical non-fiction, The Emperor of All Maladies, A Biography of Cancer. It has been one of the most informative reads I’ve ever read. Mukherjee presents a very complex topic in an accessible and interesting way striking the perfect balance in being descriptive without being overbearing & clinical. Though this book is as accessible as a biography of Cancer can possibly get, it still is a very challenging read and certainly not a breeze to get through. So in that sense it feels like an achievement just to have finished it.

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Signs for Lost Children by Sarah Moss

IMG_2295With this duology, I’m assured of Sarah Moss as a writer of incredible nuance, intelligence, observation, elegance and style. Signs for Lost Children picks up just where Bodies of Light left, so I’d really encourage one to start with Bodies of Light before they try this as the motivations of these characters, the backstories and context would all be lost by starting directly here.

Bodies of Light triumphs in its themes, but rushes through the years. Signs for Lost Children, on the other hand, is set across a single year following Ally’s marriage. Continue reading

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

IMG_1215This was my first brush with Barnes, and needless to say, I was quite floored by the brilliance of this mighty little book. The Sense of An Ending is an examination of memory and history, and the convergence of these grand themes from an unreliable, delusional narrator: Tony Webster, an old man looking back on particular events of his life. It’s an intricate portrayal of how unreliable memories can be, how we might edit things out and recreate histories of ourselves, how certain unpleasant memories can be repressed and modified into versions we ’d like to present instead. Continue reading

Bodies of Light by Sarah Moss

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Review: Oh Sarah Moss! How wonderfully you write and how nice it feels to be wrapped up in your words like a blanket! Bodies of Light was an intriguing, wonderfully written, and complex story of female roles in the 19th century, of women fighting to find their place in professional and academic settings than being restricted to domestic roles, of a dysfunctional family, a domineering mother, of mental health and its stigma, of art and its appreciation, Continue reading

Bobcat and Other Stories by Rebecca Lee

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“If you have ever felt that the table at which you sit contains everything and everybody that matters to you, like a little boat, then you know how I felt. It doesn’t feel secure at all, but rather a little tipsy. It is unnerving to love a single place so much. There are no anchors to the world outside, the cities in the distance, the country around you. There is just this: the six of you afloat so happily in the temporary day.”

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Review: This realist collection of 6 stories really took me by surprise Continue reading

Circe by Madeline Miller

IMG_0761Category: Greek Mythology, Historical Fiction, Fantasy
Rating: 5/5
Author: Madeline Miller
Circe was my first foray into Madeline Miller’s work having not read her immensely popular first novel, The Song of Achilles. Aside from the fact that it’s extensively based on Greek mythology, I didn’t know much else of what to expect and went in completely blind.

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